Operation Homecoming – Air Force Now

This extraordinary film about American POWs is one of a series of “Air Force Now” magazine type movies made for the U.S. Air Force in the 1970s and 1980s. This particular episode focuses on the return of Prisoners of War (POWs) from Vietnam after the war. It was apparently made in either late 1973 or early 1974, after Operation Homecoming took place. Operation Homecoming took place from February 14, 1973 to April of that year, and involved the return of 591 American prisoners of war held by North Vietnam. Homecoming was a negotiated part of the Paris Peace Accords that ended U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.

Other Videos You Might Be Interested In

Into The Mouth Of The Cat – The Lance P. Sijan Documentary

LANCE P. SIJAN IS THE ONLY UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY GRADUATE TO EVER RECEIVE THE CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR. THIS DOCUMENTARY PORTRAYS THE CAPTAIN’S LIFE, DEPICTS THE PERIOD OF HIS LIFE AFTER EJECTING FROM HIS DAMAGED AIRCRAFT OVER NORTH VIETNAM, AND THE TIME HE SPENT AS A PRISONER OF WAR (POW). DEMONSTRATES HOW HIS FAMILY VALUES INTERSECTED WITH THE AIR FORCE’S CORE VALUES OF “INTEGRITY FIRST, SERVICE BEFORE SELF, AND EXCELLENCE IN ALL WE

Read More »

What Life Was Like for a POW In Vietnam

Although the Vietnam conflict lasted for 20 years – from 1955 to the Fall of Saigon in 1975 – the United States government never officially declared war. Over 3 million people perished in the conflict, and hundreds of American and Vietnamese citizens were held in prison camps as unofficial POWs. The North Vietnamese captured American troops and the South Vietnamese held hundreds of North Vietnamese soldiers. These POWs were treated in different but perhaps equally

Read More »

BEYOND COURAGE – Surviving Vietnam as a P.O.W.

The Vietnam War lasted almost 20 years. It was the first war the U.S. had lost. However, the return home of the Prisoners-of-War was widely celebrated. They were held captive for almost nine years, the longest of any American war. Those pilots who survived shootdown were held in secluded prisons, hidden from the outside world except for occasional propaganda films.In 1992 I received permission from the Vietnam government to return to Hanoi and the prison

Read More »

Contact Us