Robert Wideman – Two weeks of hell – A POW’s story.

On November 17, 2013 Robert Wideman sat down and told of his experiences in the Vietnam War. Robert, born in Montreal, Canada and raised in upstate New York and Cleveland, OH, served in the Navy. A pilot, he flew 120+ missions into Vietnam off the carriers Enterprise and Hancock. On May 6, 1967, his plane was shot down over North Vietnam and Robert became a POW for the next six years. In this clip, he talks about the two weeks from the time his plane was hit until he arrived at a POW camp. Please see his full video in which he talks about his experiences. He has also written a book entitled, “Unexpected Prisoner”.

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